The Resource A geometry of music : harmony and counterpoint in the extended common practice, Dmitri Tymoczko

A geometry of music : harmony and counterpoint in the extended common practice, Dmitri Tymoczko

Label
A geometry of music : harmony and counterpoint in the extended common practice
Title
A geometry of music
Title remainder
harmony and counterpoint in the extended common practice
Statement of responsibility
Dmitri Tymoczko
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • eng
Summary
Most listeners prefer tonal music to atonal music, but what exactly is the difference between them? In this groundbreaking work, author Dmitri Tymoczko identifies five basic musical features that jointly contribute to the sense of tonality, and shows how these features recur throughout the history of Western music. Tymoczko creates for the reader a new framework for thinking about music, one that emphasizes the commonalities among styles from Medieval polyphony to contemporary jazz. A Geometry of Music provides an accessible introduction to Tymoczko's revolutionary geometrical approach to musi
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1969-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Tymoczko, Dmitri
Dewey number
781.2
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • music
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
MT50
LC item number
.T98 2011
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Oxford studies in music theory
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Harmony
  • Counterpoint
  • Musical analysis
Label
A geometry of music : harmony and counterpoint in the extended common practice, Dmitri Tymoczko
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [435]-444) and index
Contents
  • Four claims
  • Scalar and interscalar transposition
  • 4.9.
  • Interscalar transposition and voice leading
  • 4.10.
  • Combining interscalar and chromatic transpositions
  • ch. 5
  • Macroharmony and Centricity
  • 5.1.
  • Macroharmony
  • 5.2.
  • 1.3.1.
  • Small-gap macroharmony
  • 5.3.
  • Pitch-class circulation
  • 5.4.
  • Modulating the rate of pitch-class circulation
  • 5.5.
  • Macroharmonic consistency
  • 5.6.
  • Centricity
  • 5.7.
  • Harmony and counterpoint constrain one another
  • Where does centricity come from?
  • 5.8.
  • Beyond "tonal" and "atonal"
  • 5.8.1.
  • chromatic tradition
  • 5.8.2.
  • scalar tradition
  • 5.8.3.
  • Tonality space
  • ch. 6
  • 1.3.2.
  • Extended Common Practice
  • 6.1.
  • Disclaimers
  • 6.2.
  • Two-voice medieval counterpoint
  • 6.3.
  • Triads and the Renaissance
  • 6.3.1.
  • Harmonic consistency and the rise of triads
  • 6.3.2.
  • Scale, macroharmony, and centricity are independent
  • "3 + 1" voice leading
  • 6.3.3.
  • Fourth progressions and cadences
  • 6.3.4.
  • Parallel perfect intervals
  • 6.4.
  • Functional harmony
  • 6.5.
  • Schumann's Chopin
  • 6.6.
  • 1.3.3.
  • Chromaticism
  • 6.7.
  • Twentieth-century scalar music
  • 6.8.
  • extended common practice
  • ch. 7
  • Functional Harmony
  • 7.1.
  • thirds-based grammar of elementary tonal harmony
  • 7.2.
  • Modulation involves voice leading
  • Voice leading in functional tonality
  • 7.3.
  • Sequences
  • 7.4.
  • Modulation and key distance
  • 7.5.
  • two lattices
  • 7.6.
  • challenge from Schenker
  • 7.6.1.
  • 1.3.4.
  • Monism
  • 7.6.2.
  • Holism
  • 7.6.3.
  • Pluralism
  • ch. 8
  • Chromaticism
  • 8.1.
  • Decorative chromaticism
  • 8.2.
  • Music can be understood geometrically
  • Generalized augmented sixths
  • 8.3.
  • Brahms and Schoenberg
  • 8.4.
  • Schubert and the major-third system
  • 8.5.
  • Chopin's tesseract
  • 8.6.
  • Tristan prelude
  • 8.7.
  • 1.4.
  • Alternative approaches
  • 8.8.
  • Conclusion
  • ch. 9
  • Scales in Twentieth-Century Music
  • 9.1.
  • Three scalar techniques
  • 9.2.
  • Chord-first composition
  • 9.2.1.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Music, magic, and language
  • Grieg's "Drömmesyn" ("Vision"), Op. 62 No. 5 (1895)
  • 9.2.2.
  • Debussy's "Fetes" (1899)
  • 9.2.3.
  • Michael Nyman's "The Mood That Passes Through You" (1993)
  • 9.3.
  • Scale-first composition
  • 9.3.1.
  • Debussy's "Des pas sur la neige" (1910)
  • 9.3.2.
  • 1.5.
  • Janalek's "On an Overgrown Path, " Series II, No. 1 (1908)
  • 9.3.3.
  • Shostakovich's Fit Minor Prelude and Fugue, Op. 87 (1950)
  • 9.3.4.
  • Reich's New York Counterpoint (1985)
  • 9.3.5.
  • Reich's The Desert Music, movement 1 (1984)
  • 9.3.6.
  • Who's "I Can't Explain" (1965) and Bob Seger's "Turn the Page" (1973)
  • 9.4.
  • Outline of the book, and a suggestion for impatient readers
  • subset technique
  • 9.4.1.
  • Grieg's "Klokkeklang" ("Bell Ringing"), Op. 54 No. 6 (1891)
  • 9.4.2.
  • "Petit airs; from Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat (1918)
  • 9.4.3.
  • Reich's City Life (1995)
  • 9.4.4.
  • Beatles' "Help" (1965) and Stravinsky's "Dance of the Adolescents" (1913)
  • 9.4.5.
  • ch. 2
  • Miles Davis Group's "Freedom Jazz Dance" (1966)
  • 9.5.
  • Conclusion: common scales, common techniques
  • ch. 10
  • Jazz
  • 10.1.
  • Basic jazz voicings
  • 10.2.
  • From thirds to fourths
  • 10.3.
  • Harmony and Voice Leading
  • Triton substitution
  • 10.4.
  • Altered chords and scales
  • 10.5.
  • Bass and upper voice triton substitutions
  • 10.6.
  • Polytonality, sidestepping, and "playing out"
  • 10.7.
  • Bill Evans' "Oleo"
  • 10.7.1.
  • 2.1.
  • Chorus 1
  • 10.7.2.
  • Chorus 2
  • 10.7.3.
  • Chorus 3
  • 10.7.4.
  • Chorus 4
  • 10.8.
  • Jazz as modernist synthesis
  • Linear pitch space
  • 2.2.
  • Circular pitch-class space
  • 2.3.
  • ch. 1
  • Transposition and inversion as distance-preserving functions
  • 2.4.
  • Musical objects
  • 2.5.
  • Voice leadings and chord progressions
  • 2.6.
  • Comparing voice leadings
  • 2.6.1.
  • Individual and uniform transposition
  • 2.6.2.
  • Five Components of Tonality
  • Individual and uniform inversion
  • 2.7.
  • Voice-leading size
  • 2.8.
  • Near identity
  • 2.9.
  • Harmony and counterpoint revisited
  • 2.9.1.
  • Transposition
  • 2.9.2.
  • 1.1.
  • Inversion
  • 2.9.3.
  • Permutation
  • 2.10.
  • Acoustic consonance and near evenness
  • ch. 3
  • Geometry of Chords
  • 3.1.
  • Ordered pitch space
  • 3.2.
  • five features
  • Parable of the Ant
  • 3.3.
  • Two-note chord space
  • 3.4.
  • Chord progressions and voice leadings in two-note chord space
  • 3.5.
  • Geometry in analysis
  • 3.6.
  • Harmonic consistency and efficient voice leading
  • 3.7.
  • 1.2.
  • Pure parallel and pure contrary motion
  • 3.8.
  • Three-dimensional chord space
  • 3.9.
  • Higher dimensional chord spaces
  • 3.10.
  • Triads are from Mars; seventh chords are from Venus
  • 3.11.
  • Voice-leading lattices
  • 3.12.
  • Perception and the five features
  • Two musical geometries
  • 3.13.
  • Study guide
  • ch. 4
  • Scales
  • 4.1.
  • scale is a ruler
  • 4.2.
  • Scale degrees, scalar transposition, and scalar inversion
  • 4.3.
  • 1.3.
  • Evenness and scalar transposition
  • 4.4.
  • Constructing common scales
  • 4.5.
  • Modulation and voice leading
  • 4.6.
  • Voice leading between common scales
  • 4.7.
  • Two examples
  • 4.8.
Dimensions
26 cm.
Extent
xviii, 450 p.
Isbn
9780195336672
Lccn
2009046428
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2203335-01umb_inst
  • 2341595
  • (Sirsi) i9780195336672
  • (OCoLC)463675809
Label
A geometry of music : harmony and counterpoint in the extended common practice, Dmitri Tymoczko
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [435]-444) and index
Contents
  • Four claims
  • Scalar and interscalar transposition
  • 4.9.
  • Interscalar transposition and voice leading
  • 4.10.
  • Combining interscalar and chromatic transpositions
  • ch. 5
  • Macroharmony and Centricity
  • 5.1.
  • Macroharmony
  • 5.2.
  • 1.3.1.
  • Small-gap macroharmony
  • 5.3.
  • Pitch-class circulation
  • 5.4.
  • Modulating the rate of pitch-class circulation
  • 5.5.
  • Macroharmonic consistency
  • 5.6.
  • Centricity
  • 5.7.
  • Harmony and counterpoint constrain one another
  • Where does centricity come from?
  • 5.8.
  • Beyond "tonal" and "atonal"
  • 5.8.1.
  • chromatic tradition
  • 5.8.2.
  • scalar tradition
  • 5.8.3.
  • Tonality space
  • ch. 6
  • 1.3.2.
  • Extended Common Practice
  • 6.1.
  • Disclaimers
  • 6.2.
  • Two-voice medieval counterpoint
  • 6.3.
  • Triads and the Renaissance
  • 6.3.1.
  • Harmonic consistency and the rise of triads
  • 6.3.2.
  • Scale, macroharmony, and centricity are independent
  • "3 + 1" voice leading
  • 6.3.3.
  • Fourth progressions and cadences
  • 6.3.4.
  • Parallel perfect intervals
  • 6.4.
  • Functional harmony
  • 6.5.
  • Schumann's Chopin
  • 6.6.
  • 1.3.3.
  • Chromaticism
  • 6.7.
  • Twentieth-century scalar music
  • 6.8.
  • extended common practice
  • ch. 7
  • Functional Harmony
  • 7.1.
  • thirds-based grammar of elementary tonal harmony
  • 7.2.
  • Modulation involves voice leading
  • Voice leading in functional tonality
  • 7.3.
  • Sequences
  • 7.4.
  • Modulation and key distance
  • 7.5.
  • two lattices
  • 7.6.
  • challenge from Schenker
  • 7.6.1.
  • 1.3.4.
  • Monism
  • 7.6.2.
  • Holism
  • 7.6.3.
  • Pluralism
  • ch. 8
  • Chromaticism
  • 8.1.
  • Decorative chromaticism
  • 8.2.
  • Music can be understood geometrically
  • Generalized augmented sixths
  • 8.3.
  • Brahms and Schoenberg
  • 8.4.
  • Schubert and the major-third system
  • 8.5.
  • Chopin's tesseract
  • 8.6.
  • Tristan prelude
  • 8.7.
  • 1.4.
  • Alternative approaches
  • 8.8.
  • Conclusion
  • ch. 9
  • Scales in Twentieth-Century Music
  • 9.1.
  • Three scalar techniques
  • 9.2.
  • Chord-first composition
  • 9.2.1.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Music, magic, and language
  • Grieg's "Drömmesyn" ("Vision"), Op. 62 No. 5 (1895)
  • 9.2.2.
  • Debussy's "Fetes" (1899)
  • 9.2.3.
  • Michael Nyman's "The Mood That Passes Through You" (1993)
  • 9.3.
  • Scale-first composition
  • 9.3.1.
  • Debussy's "Des pas sur la neige" (1910)
  • 9.3.2.
  • 1.5.
  • Janalek's "On an Overgrown Path, " Series II, No. 1 (1908)
  • 9.3.3.
  • Shostakovich's Fit Minor Prelude and Fugue, Op. 87 (1950)
  • 9.3.4.
  • Reich's New York Counterpoint (1985)
  • 9.3.5.
  • Reich's The Desert Music, movement 1 (1984)
  • 9.3.6.
  • Who's "I Can't Explain" (1965) and Bob Seger's "Turn the Page" (1973)
  • 9.4.
  • Outline of the book, and a suggestion for impatient readers
  • subset technique
  • 9.4.1.
  • Grieg's "Klokkeklang" ("Bell Ringing"), Op. 54 No. 6 (1891)
  • 9.4.2.
  • "Petit airs; from Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat (1918)
  • 9.4.3.
  • Reich's City Life (1995)
  • 9.4.4.
  • Beatles' "Help" (1965) and Stravinsky's "Dance of the Adolescents" (1913)
  • 9.4.5.
  • ch. 2
  • Miles Davis Group's "Freedom Jazz Dance" (1966)
  • 9.5.
  • Conclusion: common scales, common techniques
  • ch. 10
  • Jazz
  • 10.1.
  • Basic jazz voicings
  • 10.2.
  • From thirds to fourths
  • 10.3.
  • Harmony and Voice Leading
  • Triton substitution
  • 10.4.
  • Altered chords and scales
  • 10.5.
  • Bass and upper voice triton substitutions
  • 10.6.
  • Polytonality, sidestepping, and "playing out"
  • 10.7.
  • Bill Evans' "Oleo"
  • 10.7.1.
  • 2.1.
  • Chorus 1
  • 10.7.2.
  • Chorus 2
  • 10.7.3.
  • Chorus 3
  • 10.7.4.
  • Chorus 4
  • 10.8.
  • Jazz as modernist synthesis
  • Linear pitch space
  • 2.2.
  • Circular pitch-class space
  • 2.3.
  • ch. 1
  • Transposition and inversion as distance-preserving functions
  • 2.4.
  • Musical objects
  • 2.5.
  • Voice leadings and chord progressions
  • 2.6.
  • Comparing voice leadings
  • 2.6.1.
  • Individual and uniform transposition
  • 2.6.2.
  • Five Components of Tonality
  • Individual and uniform inversion
  • 2.7.
  • Voice-leading size
  • 2.8.
  • Near identity
  • 2.9.
  • Harmony and counterpoint revisited
  • 2.9.1.
  • Transposition
  • 2.9.2.
  • 1.1.
  • Inversion
  • 2.9.3.
  • Permutation
  • 2.10.
  • Acoustic consonance and near evenness
  • ch. 3
  • Geometry of Chords
  • 3.1.
  • Ordered pitch space
  • 3.2.
  • five features
  • Parable of the Ant
  • 3.3.
  • Two-note chord space
  • 3.4.
  • Chord progressions and voice leadings in two-note chord space
  • 3.5.
  • Geometry in analysis
  • 3.6.
  • Harmonic consistency and efficient voice leading
  • 3.7.
  • 1.2.
  • Pure parallel and pure contrary motion
  • 3.8.
  • Three-dimensional chord space
  • 3.9.
  • Higher dimensional chord spaces
  • 3.10.
  • Triads are from Mars; seventh chords are from Venus
  • 3.11.
  • Voice-leading lattices
  • 3.12.
  • Perception and the five features
  • Two musical geometries
  • 3.13.
  • Study guide
  • ch. 4
  • Scales
  • 4.1.
  • scale is a ruler
  • 4.2.
  • Scale degrees, scalar transposition, and scalar inversion
  • 4.3.
  • 1.3.
  • Evenness and scalar transposition
  • 4.4.
  • Constructing common scales
  • 4.5.
  • Modulation and voice leading
  • 4.6.
  • Voice leading between common scales
  • 4.7.
  • Two examples
  • 4.8.
Dimensions
26 cm.
Extent
xviii, 450 p.
Isbn
9780195336672
Lccn
2009046428
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2203335-01umb_inst
  • 2341595
  • (Sirsi) i9780195336672
  • (OCoLC)463675809

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