The Resource Care/work : law reform to support family caregivers to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving : a study paper, prepared by the British Columbia Law Institute & Canadian Centre for Elder Law, (electronic resource)

Care/work : law reform to support family caregivers to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving : a study paper, prepared by the British Columbia Law Institute & Canadian Centre for Elder Law, (electronic resource)

Label
Care/work : law reform to support family caregivers to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving : a study paper
Title
Care/work
Title remainder
law reform to support family caregivers to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving : a study paper
Statement of responsibility
prepared by the British Columbia Law Institute & Canadian Centre for Elder Law
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Care/Work examines to what extent the laws of British Columbia support caregivers of adult family members to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving, and considers whether BC laws recognize the social value of unpaid caregiving labour. This study paper is primarily a research paper; however, it also concludes with an array of suggestions for law reform that would both render the law more responsive to the needs of caregivers and enhance the value public policy attaches to the unpaid labour of BC family caregivers."--Executive summary
Member of
Cataloging source
CaOONL
Dewey number
649.8/09711
Index
no index present
LC call number
RA645.37.C26
LC item number
C278 2010eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
NLM call number
W 33.DC26
NLM item number
C278 2010eb
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • British Columbia Law Institute
  • Canadian Centre for Elder Law Studies
  • Canadian Electronic Library (Firm)
Series statement
  • BCLI study paper
  • CCEL study paper
Series volume
  • 4
  • 4
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Caregivers
  • Caregivers
  • Caregivers
  • Labor laws and legislation
  • Caregivers
Label
Care/work : law reform to support family caregivers to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving : a study paper, prepared by the British Columbia Law Institute & Canadian Centre for Elder Law, (electronic resource)
Link
http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/224599
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "February 2010"
  • Issued as part of the desLibris documents collection
Antecedent source
not applicable
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Executive summary -- Chapter 1: Background and project overview. -- I. Introduction -- II. The social framework: recent changes impacting family caregiving -- III. The ideological framework: theorizing family care and the meaning of work -- IV. The legal framework governing family care -- V. Methodology, structure and the role of story-telling in this report -- VI. The value of care: how value and values inform this project -- VII. Why this study paper is needed --
  • Chapter 2: Family caregiving in BC. I. The growth of community care in Canada -- II. Demographics fueling the caregiving crisis -- III. The prevalence of family caregiving -- IV. Family caregiving and women -- V. What is family caregiving? -- VI. A note on the term "family caregiver" --
  • Chapter 3: Employment leave for family caregiving. I. Overview of the Employment Standards Act -- II. Family care entitlements under the Employment Standards Act: A. Section 52 - Family responsibility leave; B. Section 52.1 - Compassionate care leave -- III. Comparison with other jurisdictions in Canada: A. Short-term leave; B. Long-term leave -- IV. The unionized worker -- V. Employment Insurance and caregiving leave -- VI. The results of our survey of BC employers -- VII. Comparisons with other leave rights in BC -- VIII. Problems with the Employment Standards / Employment Insurance framework -- IX. International review: alternative approaches -- X. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 4: Family responsibilities accommodation in the workplace. I. The meaning of workplace flexibility -- II. Employee access to work flexibility in BC -- A. BC caregivers seek additional workplace flexibility -- B. Flexibility, part-time options and the results of our survey of employers -- III. The human rights framework in British Columbia -- IV. Family responsibilities discrimination in BC - the recent legal test -- V. Recent family responsibilities discrimination cases in BC and Canada -- VI. An overview of criticisms of the Campbell River Test -- VII. The bigger picture - the meaning of "family status": A. Human rights legislation in Canada; B. Supreme Court of Canada guidance on the meaning of family status; C. Other relevant grounds: marital status and sex -- VIII. Human rights approaches to caregiver discrimination outside Canada: alternatives to the family status ground: A. The United States; B. New Zealand; C. Australia; D. Discussion -- IX. Employment standards and the duty to accommodate -- X. The European Union and part-time employment rights -- XI. Conclusion: employment standards vs. human rights --
  • Chapter 5: Indirect compensation of caregivers through the tax system. I. The financial consequences of family caregiving on the caregiver -- II. An overview of the tax approach -- III. Tax credits available to family caregivers: A. Personal credits; B. Medical expenses credit; C. Disability tax credit -- IV. Criticisms of existing tax credits in BC and Canada -- V. The refundable caregiver tax credit: an option for reform -- VI. Tax incentives and caregiving labour -- VII. Reflections on the income tax approach to compensation -- VIII. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 6: Direct payments to caregivers. I. Income support for family caregivers -- II. British Columbia programs for self-managed care -- III. International innovations in direct compensation of family caregivers: A. Care allowances; B. Family caregiver wage; C. Transferable payments to care-recipients -- IV. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 7: Pension reform to address the long-term financial consequences of family caregiving. I. An overview of the pensions system in BC: A. Old Age Security (OAS); B. Canada Pension Plan (CPP) -- II. The Canada Pension Plan drop-out provision: a model for reform: A. CPP - child rearing provision; B. CPP - low earnings drop-out provisions -- III. Problems with the drop-out provision approach -- IV. International innovations in pension security for family caregivers: A. Carer pensions; B. Pension plan contributions for family caregivers -- V. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 8: Conclusion. I. Overview -- II. The Law of Family Caregiving: A. Employment leave provisions; B. Family responsibilities accommodation and workplace flexibility; C. Measures that offset income loss -- III. Recap: summary of our "fictitious" caregivers -- IV. Impact of current laws on our caregivers: A. Leave; B. Workplace accommodation; C. Income support; D. Pension security -- V. Options for reform: 1. Employment leave; 2. Workplace accommodation of family responsibilities; 3. Caregiver tax credit; 4. Direct income support; 5. Pension security; 6. Valorization of caregiving labour -- VI. Final words: law reform to support family caregiving
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 electronic text (xii, 112 p.)
Form of item
online
Other physical details
digital file.
Publisher number
224599
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (CaBNVSL)gtp00544358
  • (OCoLC)758075858
  • (CaOOCEL)224599
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Label
Care/work : law reform to support family caregivers to balance paid work and unpaid caregiving : a study paper, prepared by the British Columbia Law Institute & Canadian Centre for Elder Law, (electronic resource)
Link
http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/224599
Publication
Note
  • "February 2010"
  • Issued as part of the desLibris documents collection
Antecedent source
not applicable
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Executive summary -- Chapter 1: Background and project overview. -- I. Introduction -- II. The social framework: recent changes impacting family caregiving -- III. The ideological framework: theorizing family care and the meaning of work -- IV. The legal framework governing family care -- V. Methodology, structure and the role of story-telling in this report -- VI. The value of care: how value and values inform this project -- VII. Why this study paper is needed --
  • Chapter 2: Family caregiving in BC. I. The growth of community care in Canada -- II. Demographics fueling the caregiving crisis -- III. The prevalence of family caregiving -- IV. Family caregiving and women -- V. What is family caregiving? -- VI. A note on the term "family caregiver" --
  • Chapter 3: Employment leave for family caregiving. I. Overview of the Employment Standards Act -- II. Family care entitlements under the Employment Standards Act: A. Section 52 - Family responsibility leave; B. Section 52.1 - Compassionate care leave -- III. Comparison with other jurisdictions in Canada: A. Short-term leave; B. Long-term leave -- IV. The unionized worker -- V. Employment Insurance and caregiving leave -- VI. The results of our survey of BC employers -- VII. Comparisons with other leave rights in BC -- VIII. Problems with the Employment Standards / Employment Insurance framework -- IX. International review: alternative approaches -- X. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 4: Family responsibilities accommodation in the workplace. I. The meaning of workplace flexibility -- II. Employee access to work flexibility in BC -- A. BC caregivers seek additional workplace flexibility -- B. Flexibility, part-time options and the results of our survey of employers -- III. The human rights framework in British Columbia -- IV. Family responsibilities discrimination in BC - the recent legal test -- V. Recent family responsibilities discrimination cases in BC and Canada -- VI. An overview of criticisms of the Campbell River Test -- VII. The bigger picture - the meaning of "family status": A. Human rights legislation in Canada; B. Supreme Court of Canada guidance on the meaning of family status; C. Other relevant grounds: marital status and sex -- VIII. Human rights approaches to caregiver discrimination outside Canada: alternatives to the family status ground: A. The United States; B. New Zealand; C. Australia; D. Discussion -- IX. Employment standards and the duty to accommodate -- X. The European Union and part-time employment rights -- XI. Conclusion: employment standards vs. human rights --
  • Chapter 5: Indirect compensation of caregivers through the tax system. I. The financial consequences of family caregiving on the caregiver -- II. An overview of the tax approach -- III. Tax credits available to family caregivers: A. Personal credits; B. Medical expenses credit; C. Disability tax credit -- IV. Criticisms of existing tax credits in BC and Canada -- V. The refundable caregiver tax credit: an option for reform -- VI. Tax incentives and caregiving labour -- VII. Reflections on the income tax approach to compensation -- VIII. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 6: Direct payments to caregivers. I. Income support for family caregivers -- II. British Columbia programs for self-managed care -- III. International innovations in direct compensation of family caregivers: A. Care allowances; B. Family caregiver wage; C. Transferable payments to care-recipients -- IV. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 7: Pension reform to address the long-term financial consequences of family caregiving. I. An overview of the pensions system in BC: A. Old Age Security (OAS); B. Canada Pension Plan (CPP) -- II. The Canada Pension Plan drop-out provision: a model for reform: A. CPP - child rearing provision; B. CPP - low earnings drop-out provisions -- III. Problems with the drop-out provision approach -- IV. International innovations in pension security for family caregivers: A. Carer pensions; B. Pension plan contributions for family caregivers -- V. Conclusion --
  • Chapter 8: Conclusion. I. Overview -- II. The Law of Family Caregiving: A. Employment leave provisions; B. Family responsibilities accommodation and workplace flexibility; C. Measures that offset income loss -- III. Recap: summary of our "fictitious" caregivers -- IV. Impact of current laws on our caregivers: A. Leave; B. Workplace accommodation; C. Income support; D. Pension security -- V. Options for reform: 1. Employment leave; 2. Workplace accommodation of family responsibilities; 3. Caregiver tax credit; 4. Direct income support; 5. Pension security; 6. Valorization of caregiving labour -- VI. Final words: law reform to support family caregiving
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 electronic text (xii, 112 p.)
Form of item
online
Other physical details
digital file.
Publisher number
224599
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (CaBNVSL)gtp00544358
  • (OCoLC)758075858
  • (CaOOCEL)224599
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web

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