The Resource Comparative criminal justice systems : a topical approach, Philip L. Reichel

Comparative criminal justice systems : a topical approach, Philip L. Reichel

Label
Comparative criminal justice systems : a topical approach
Title
Comparative criminal justice systems
Title remainder
a topical approach
Statement of responsibility
Philip L. Reichel
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Reichel, Philip L
Dewey number
364
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
HV7419
LC item number
.R45 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Criminal justice, Administration of
  • Criminal justice, Administration of
  • Justice pénale
  • Justice pénale
Label
Comparative criminal justice systems : a topical approach, Philip L. Reichel
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 421-446) and index
Contents
  • 1. An international perspective -- Why study the legal system of other countries? -- Provincial benefits of an international perspective -- Universal benefits of an international perspective -- Neighbor cooperation -- Multinational cooperation -- Approaches to an international perspective -- Historical approach -- Political approach -- Descriptive approach -- Strategies under the descriptive approach -- The functions/procedures strategy -- The institutions/actors strategy -- Comparison through classification -- The need for classification -- Classification strategies -- The role of classification in this book -- The structure of this book -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 2. Domestic crime, transnational crime, and justice -- Comparative criminology and criminal justice -- Comparative criminology looks at crime as a social phenomenon -- Comparing similar data -- Comparing over time -- Using United Nations crime data -- Comparative criminology looks at crime as social behavior -- Modernization theories -- Civilization theory -- World system theory -- Opportunity theories -- Transnational crime -- Transnational crime types -- Computer crime -- Corruption and bribery of public officials, party officials, and elected representatives -- Illicit drug trafficking -- Money laundering -- Sea piracy -- Theft of art and cultural objects -- Trade in human body parts -- Trafficking in persons -- Terrorism -- Domestic and international terrorism -- Terrorism typologies -- Communist/socialist -- Nationalist/separatist -- Religious -- Response to transnational crime -- National efforts : United States of America -- International efforts -- Interpol responds to transnational crime -- The United Nations responds to transnational crime -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 3. An American perspective on criminal law -- Essential ingredients of justice systems -- Substantive criminal law -- General characteristics of criminal law -- Major principles of criminal law -- Procedural criminal law -- Constitutional provisions for the criminal process -- Crime control model -- Due process model -- Liberty, safety, and fighting terrorism -- The USA PATRIOT Act, substantive law issues -- Section 206 -- Section 215 -- Section 213 -- Due process and terrorist suspects, procedural law issues -- Is America's reaction that different? -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 4. Legal traditions -- Legal systems and legal traditions -- Today's four legal traditions -- Common legal tradition -- Feudal practices -- Custom -- Equity -- Civil legal tradition -- Roman law -- Canon law -- Codification -- Socialist legal tradition -- Russian law -- Law as artificial -- Marxism-Leninism -- Socialist legal tradition after the USSR's demise -- Islamic (religious/philosophical) legal tradition -- The Qur'an and Sunna -- Ijma and Qiyas -- Schools of law -- Comparison of the legal traditions -- Cultural component -- Private and public law -- Balance/separation of powers -- Substantive component -- Primary source of common law -- Primary source of civil law -- Primary source of socialist law -- Primary source of Islamic law -- Procedural component -- Flexibility in common law -- Flexibility in civil law -- Flexibility in socialist law -- Flexibility in Islamic law -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 5. Substantive law and procedural law in the four legal traditions -- Substantive criminal law -- General characteristics and major principles -- Substantive law in the common legal tradition -- Substantive law in the civil legal tradition -- Substantive law in the socialist legal tradition -- Substantive law in Islamic legal tradition -- Hudud crimes -- Qisas crimes -- Tazir crimes -- Procedural criminal law -- Adjudicatory processes -- Inquisitorial process -- Adversarial process -- Contrasting adversarial and inquisitorial processes -- Procedural law in the Islamic legal tradition -- Judicial review -- Diffuse model for judicial review -- Concentrated model for judicial review -- Mixed model for judicial review -- Judicial review in the Islamic and socialist traditions -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 6. An international perspective on policing -- Classification of police structures -- Centralized single systems : Ghana -- Decentralized single systems : Japan -- Centralized multiple coordinated systems : France -- Gendarmerie nationale -- Police nationale -- Decentralized multiple coordinated systems : Germany -- Centralized multiple uncoordinated systems : Spain -- Guardia civil -- Cuerpo nacional de policia -- Policia municipal -- Uncoordinated policing -- Decentralized multiple uncoordinated systems : Mexico -- Federal policing -- State policing -- Municipal policing -- Federal district policing -- Reform attempts -- Policing issues : police misconduct -- Policing issues : global cooperation -- International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO), Interpol -- Europol -- Examples of harmonization and approximation in the European Union -- The Schengen Convention -- The European arrest warrant -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 7. An international perspective on courts -- Professional actors in the judiciary -- Variation in legal training -- Variation in prosecution -- United States -- France -- England and Wales -- Variation in defense -- The adjudicators -- Presumption of innocence -- Professional judges -- An independent judiciary -- Becoming a judge -- Lay judges and jurors -- Juries -- Lay judges -- Examples along the adjudication continuum -- Saudi Arabia -- England -- Germany -- Variation in court organization -- France -- Trial level : police court -- Trial level : correctional courts -- Trial level : assize court -- Appellate level : courts of appeal -- Appellate level : Supreme Court of Appeal -- England and Wales -- Her Majesty's Court Service -- Trial level : magistrates' court -- Trial level : Crown Court -- Appellate level : Court of Appeal -- Appellate level : House of Lords -- Nigeria -- China -- Saudi Arabia -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 8. An international perspective on corrections -- Comparative penology -- Typologies for comparative penology -- Punishment -- Justifications for punishment -- International standards for corrections -- International agreements on corrections -- Financial penalties -- Fines -- Day fines -- Examples from Sweden and Germany -- Compensation to victims and community -- Diyya in Saudi Arabia -- Donation penalties in Germany -- Corporal and capital punishment -- International standards -- Corporal punishment -- Capital punishment -- Retention and abolition around the world -- Why the variation in acceptance? -- The role of public opinion -- The death penalty in china -- Noncustodial sanctions -- International standards -- Community corrections -- Probation -- Probation's history around the world -- Probation today -- Custodial sanctions -- International standards -- Prison populations -- Prison systems -- South Africa -- Brazil -- India -- Women in prison -- The small numbers of women prisoners -- The impact of imprisoning drug offenders -- Needs and problems of women prisoners -- Minorities in prison -- Disparity around the world -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 9. An international perspective on juvenile justice -- Delinquency as a worldwide problem -- Setting international standards -- Determining who are juveniles -- Determining the process -- Models of juvenile justice -- Welfare model -- New Zealand's version of the welfare model -- Police response -- Family group conference -- Youth court -- Legalistic model -- Preliminary investigation -- Preliminary hearing -- Trial -- Corporatist model -- Key agencies -- Diversion options -- Youth court -- Participatory model -- The importance of legal education -- Other informal efforts -- Formal procedures -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 10. Japan : examples of effectiveness and borrowing -- Why study Japan? -- Japan's effective criminal justice system -- Borrowing in a cross-cultural context -- Japanese cultural patterns -- Homogeneity -- Contextualism and harmony -- Collectivism -- Hierarchies and order -- Criminal law -- Law by bureaucratic informalism -- Policing -- Why are the Japanese police effective? -- Deployment of police officers -- The citizen as partner -- Policing as service -- Judiciary -- Pretrial activities -- Police role -- Prosecutor role -- Defense attorney role -- Court structure and trial options -- Court structure -- Adjudication in summary courts -- Adjudication with modified public trials -- Adjudication with regular trials -- Judgments -- Corrections -- Community corrections -- Probation and parole -- Prison sentences -- Coming full circle -- What might work -- Summary -- Discussion questions
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
5th ed.
Extent
xxi, 472 p.
Isbn
9780132392549
Lccn
2006039196
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2068950-01umb_inst
  • 2052289
  • (OCoLC)76828886
Label
Comparative criminal justice systems : a topical approach, Philip L. Reichel
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 421-446) and index
Contents
  • 1. An international perspective -- Why study the legal system of other countries? -- Provincial benefits of an international perspective -- Universal benefits of an international perspective -- Neighbor cooperation -- Multinational cooperation -- Approaches to an international perspective -- Historical approach -- Political approach -- Descriptive approach -- Strategies under the descriptive approach -- The functions/procedures strategy -- The institutions/actors strategy -- Comparison through classification -- The need for classification -- Classification strategies -- The role of classification in this book -- The structure of this book -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 2. Domestic crime, transnational crime, and justice -- Comparative criminology and criminal justice -- Comparative criminology looks at crime as a social phenomenon -- Comparing similar data -- Comparing over time -- Using United Nations crime data -- Comparative criminology looks at crime as social behavior -- Modernization theories -- Civilization theory -- World system theory -- Opportunity theories -- Transnational crime -- Transnational crime types -- Computer crime -- Corruption and bribery of public officials, party officials, and elected representatives -- Illicit drug trafficking -- Money laundering -- Sea piracy -- Theft of art and cultural objects -- Trade in human body parts -- Trafficking in persons -- Terrorism -- Domestic and international terrorism -- Terrorism typologies -- Communist/socialist -- Nationalist/separatist -- Religious -- Response to transnational crime -- National efforts : United States of America -- International efforts -- Interpol responds to transnational crime -- The United Nations responds to transnational crime -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 3. An American perspective on criminal law -- Essential ingredients of justice systems -- Substantive criminal law -- General characteristics of criminal law -- Major principles of criminal law -- Procedural criminal law -- Constitutional provisions for the criminal process -- Crime control model -- Due process model -- Liberty, safety, and fighting terrorism -- The USA PATRIOT Act, substantive law issues -- Section 206 -- Section 215 -- Section 213 -- Due process and terrorist suspects, procedural law issues -- Is America's reaction that different? -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 4. Legal traditions -- Legal systems and legal traditions -- Today's four legal traditions -- Common legal tradition -- Feudal practices -- Custom -- Equity -- Civil legal tradition -- Roman law -- Canon law -- Codification -- Socialist legal tradition -- Russian law -- Law as artificial -- Marxism-Leninism -- Socialist legal tradition after the USSR's demise -- Islamic (religious/philosophical) legal tradition -- The Qur'an and Sunna -- Ijma and Qiyas -- Schools of law -- Comparison of the legal traditions -- Cultural component -- Private and public law -- Balance/separation of powers -- Substantive component -- Primary source of common law -- Primary source of civil law -- Primary source of socialist law -- Primary source of Islamic law -- Procedural component -- Flexibility in common law -- Flexibility in civil law -- Flexibility in socialist law -- Flexibility in Islamic law -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 5. Substantive law and procedural law in the four legal traditions -- Substantive criminal law -- General characteristics and major principles -- Substantive law in the common legal tradition -- Substantive law in the civil legal tradition -- Substantive law in the socialist legal tradition -- Substantive law in Islamic legal tradition -- Hudud crimes -- Qisas crimes -- Tazir crimes -- Procedural criminal law -- Adjudicatory processes -- Inquisitorial process -- Adversarial process -- Contrasting adversarial and inquisitorial processes -- Procedural law in the Islamic legal tradition -- Judicial review -- Diffuse model for judicial review -- Concentrated model for judicial review -- Mixed model for judicial review -- Judicial review in the Islamic and socialist traditions -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 6. An international perspective on policing -- Classification of police structures -- Centralized single systems : Ghana -- Decentralized single systems : Japan -- Centralized multiple coordinated systems : France -- Gendarmerie nationale -- Police nationale -- Decentralized multiple coordinated systems : Germany -- Centralized multiple uncoordinated systems : Spain -- Guardia civil -- Cuerpo nacional de policia -- Policia municipal -- Uncoordinated policing -- Decentralized multiple uncoordinated systems : Mexico -- Federal policing -- State policing -- Municipal policing -- Federal district policing -- Reform attempts -- Policing issues : police misconduct -- Policing issues : global cooperation -- International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO), Interpol -- Europol -- Examples of harmonization and approximation in the European Union -- The Schengen Convention -- The European arrest warrant -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 7. An international perspective on courts -- Professional actors in the judiciary -- Variation in legal training -- Variation in prosecution -- United States -- France -- England and Wales -- Variation in defense -- The adjudicators -- Presumption of innocence -- Professional judges -- An independent judiciary -- Becoming a judge -- Lay judges and jurors -- Juries -- Lay judges -- Examples along the adjudication continuum -- Saudi Arabia -- England -- Germany -- Variation in court organization -- France -- Trial level : police court -- Trial level : correctional courts -- Trial level : assize court -- Appellate level : courts of appeal -- Appellate level : Supreme Court of Appeal -- England and Wales -- Her Majesty's Court Service -- Trial level : magistrates' court -- Trial level : Crown Court -- Appellate level : Court of Appeal -- Appellate level : House of Lords -- Nigeria -- China -- Saudi Arabia -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 8. An international perspective on corrections -- Comparative penology -- Typologies for comparative penology -- Punishment -- Justifications for punishment -- International standards for corrections -- International agreements on corrections -- Financial penalties -- Fines -- Day fines -- Examples from Sweden and Germany -- Compensation to victims and community -- Diyya in Saudi Arabia -- Donation penalties in Germany -- Corporal and capital punishment -- International standards -- Corporal punishment -- Capital punishment -- Retention and abolition around the world -- Why the variation in acceptance? -- The role of public opinion -- The death penalty in china -- Noncustodial sanctions -- International standards -- Community corrections -- Probation -- Probation's history around the world -- Probation today -- Custodial sanctions -- International standards -- Prison populations -- Prison systems -- South Africa -- Brazil -- India -- Women in prison -- The small numbers of women prisoners -- The impact of imprisoning drug offenders -- Needs and problems of women prisoners -- Minorities in prison -- Disparity around the world -- Summary -- Discussion questions --
  • 9. An international perspective on juvenile justice -- Delinquency as a worldwide problem -- Setting international standards -- Determining who are juveniles -- Determining the process -- Models of juvenile justice -- Welfare model -- New Zealand's version of the welfare model -- Police response -- Family group conference -- Youth court -- Legalistic model -- Preliminary investigation -- Preliminary hearing -- Trial -- Corporatist model -- Key agencies -- Diversion options -- Youth court -- Participatory model -- The importance of legal education -- Other informal efforts -- Formal procedures -- Summary -- Discussion questions -- 10. Japan : examples of effectiveness and borrowing -- Why study Japan? -- Japan's effective criminal justice system -- Borrowing in a cross-cultural context -- Japanese cultural patterns -- Homogeneity -- Contextualism and harmony -- Collectivism -- Hierarchies and order -- Criminal law -- Law by bureaucratic informalism -- Policing -- Why are the Japanese police effective? -- Deployment of police officers -- The citizen as partner -- Policing as service -- Judiciary -- Pretrial activities -- Police role -- Prosecutor role -- Defense attorney role -- Court structure and trial options -- Court structure -- Adjudication in summary courts -- Adjudication with modified public trials -- Adjudication with regular trials -- Judgments -- Corrections -- Community corrections -- Probation and parole -- Prison sentences -- Coming full circle -- What might work -- Summary -- Discussion questions
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
5th ed.
Extent
xxi, 472 p.
Isbn
9780132392549
Lccn
2006039196
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2068950-01umb_inst
  • 2052289
  • (OCoLC)76828886

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