The Resource Complex emotions and grammatical mismatches : a contrastive corpus-based study, by Katarzyna Dziwirek, Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk

Complex emotions and grammatical mismatches : a contrastive corpus-based study, by Katarzyna Dziwirek, Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk

Label
Complex emotions and grammatical mismatches : a contrastive corpus-based study
Title
Complex emotions and grammatical mismatches
Title remainder
a contrastive corpus-based study
Statement of responsibility
by Katarzyna Dziwirek, Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • The series welcomes book proposals from any domain where the theoretical insights developed in Cognitive Linguistics (CL) have been fruitfully applied. Researchers in different academic fields apply the CL theoretical framework to the investigation of linguistic issues in their particular disciplines. The primary focus of ACL is to serve as a high level forum for the result of these investigations
  • The book offers a comparison of the structure and meaning of emotion concepts in large authentic Polish and English corpora. The authors investigate emotions which enter into relations with complex complements. The book is an excellent didactic tool and serves as reference material for teachers and students of Polish and English. translators, dictionary editors, and culture specialists. -- Book Jacket
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dziwirek, Katarzyna
Dewey number
491.8/55
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
  • PG6099
  • PG6099
LC item number
.D94 2010
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Barbara
Series statement
ACL
Series volume
16
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Polish language
  • English language
  • Cognitive grammar
Label
Complex emotions and grammatical mismatches : a contrastive corpus-based study, by Katarzyna Dziwirek, Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [167]-179) and index
Contents
  • Desirability of a Harmonised Measure of Damages
  • Bereavement
  • 7.
  • Non-Pecuniary Loss in Contract
  • I.
  • Overview of the Present Law
  • II.
  • General Bar to Compensation
  • III.
  • Exception for Personal Injury
  • IV.
  • IV.
  • Exception for Physical Inconvenience
  • V.
  • 'Object of the Contract' Exception
  • VI.
  • Loss of Reputation
  • VII.
  • Need for Reform
  • VIII.
  • Defensibility of the General Bar to Compensation
  • A.
  • Possibility of a Harmonised Measure of Damages
  • Avoiding Punishment
  • B.
  • Avoiding Excessive Awards
  • C.
  • General Remoteness of Non-Pecuniary Loss
  • D.
  • Assumption of Risk
  • E.
  • Difficult Assessment
  • F.
  • V.
  • Lower Cost of Contracting
  • G.
  • Avoiding a Flood of Claims
  • H.
  • Avoiding Bogus Claims
  • IX.
  • Way of Reform
  • 8.
  • Non-Pecuniary Loss in Equity
  • I.
  • Methodology Adopted in this Book
  • Breach of Confidence in Its Core Meaning
  • II.
  • Breach of Confidence in Its Extended Meaning ('Breach of Privacy')
  • III.
  • Other Equitable Wrongs
  • 9.
  • Contributory Negligence in Tort
  • I.
  • Position Apart From the1945 Act
  • II.
  • 2.
  • Ambit of the 1945 Act
  • III.
  • Causation
  • IV.
  • Claimant's Fault
  • V.
  • Damage
  • VI.
  • Apportionment
  • 10.
  • Present Remoteness Test in Tort
  • Contributory Negligence in Contract
  • I.
  • Position apart from the 1945 Act
  • II.
  • Impact of the 1945 Act[— ]Overview
  • III.
  • Breach of a Duty of Care Co-Extensive in Contract and Tort
  • IV.
  • Breach of a Purely Contractual Duty of Care
  • V.
  • I.
  • Strict Contractual Liability[— ]The Present Law
  • VI.
  • Need for Apportionment in Cases of Strict Liability
  • A.
  • Resorting to Causation Doctrine
  • B.
  • Resorting to Remoteness Doctrine
  • C.
  • Resorting to Mitigation Doctrine
  • VII.
  • Terminology
  • Defensibility of Denying Apportionment in Cases of Strict Liability
  • A.
  • No Duty to Supervise the Defendant
  • B.
  • Distribution of Blame is Difficult
  • C.
  • Uncertainty
  • D.
  • Inequalities of Bargaining Power
  • VIII.
  • II.
  • Way of Reform
  • 11.
  • Contributory Negligence in Equity
  • 12.
  • Present Law of 'Restitution for Wrongs'
  • I.
  • Terminology
  • II.
  • Inclusion of Hypothetical-Fee Awards
  • III.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Foreseeability Criterion in Negligence
  • Equity
  • A.
  • Breach of Fiduciary Duty
  • B.
  • Breach of Confidence Including Breach of Privacy
  • IV.
  • Tort
  • A.
  • Historical Development
  • B.
  • III.
  • Wrongful Interference with Goods
  • C.
  • Trespass to Land
  • D.
  • Intellectual Property Wrongs
  • E.
  • Nuisance
  • F.
  • Deceit and Fraud
  • V.
  • Damage Versus Risk
  • Contract
  • A.
  • Hypothetical-Fee Award ('Wrotham Park Damages')
  • B.
  • Account of Profits ('Blake Damages')
  • 13.
  • Proper Scope of 'Restitution for Wrongs'
  • I.
  • Existing Theories
  • A.
  • IV.
  • Birks
  • B.
  • Edelman
  • C.
  • Friedmann
  • D.
  • Jackman
  • E.
  • Jaffey
  • F.
  • Degree of Foresight Required
  • Tettenborn
  • G.
  • Weinrib
  • H.
  • Worthington
  • II.
  • Significance of Exclusive Entitlements
  • III.
  • Exclusive Entitlements Erga Omnes
  • A.
  • V.
  • Tangible and Intangible Property
  • B.
  • Bodily Integrity
  • C.
  • Reputation
  • D.
  • Informational Rights
  • IV.
  • Exclusive Entitlements Inter Partes
  • A.
  • 'Thin Skull' Rule
  • Contractual Right to Have Property Transferred
  • i.
  • Land and Intangible Property
  • ii.
  • Specific Chattel
  • iii.
  • Generic Goods
  • B.
  • Contractual Right to Be Treated As the Owner of Certain Property
  • C.
  • VI.
  • Contractual Right to Someone Else's 'Labour Power'?
  • D.
  • Right to the Loyalty of One's Fiduciary
  • V.
  • Situations in Which 'Restitution for Wrongs' is Inappropriate
  • A.
  • Deceit
  • B.
  • Skimped Contractual Performance
  • VI.
  • 'Scope of the Duty' Concept
  • Exclusive-Entitlement Theory and Present Law Compared
  • 14.
  • Present Law of Exemplary Damages
  • I.
  • Terminology
  • II.
  • Rookes v Barnard
  • III.
  • Abuse of Power by Civil Servants
  • A.
  • VII.
  • Conduct Required
  • B.
  • Status of the Defendant
  • C.
  • Criticism
  • IV.
  • Profit-Seeking Behaviour
  • A.
  • Fields of Application
  • B.
  • 1.
  • Torts other than Negligence
  • Criticism
  • V.
  • Statutory Authorisation
  • VI.
  • 'Cause of Action' Test
  • VII.
  • Exemplary Damages in Contract
  • VIII.
  • Exemplary Damages in Equity
  • IX.
  • 3.
  • Need for Reform
  • 15.
  • Objective of Exemplary Damages
  • I.
  • Penalising Reprehensible Behaviour
  • II.
  • Fostering Efficient Deterrence
  • A.
  • Correction for Undercompensation
  • B.
  • Present Remoteness Test in Contract
  • Correction for Underenforcement
  • C.
  • Correction for Court Errors
  • D.
  • Offsetting Illicit Benefits and Exceptional Costs
  • E.
  • Encouraging Negotiations about the Use of Rights
  • F.
  • Conclusion
  • 16.
  • I.
  • Defensibility of Confining Exemplary Damages to Tort
  • I.
  • Defensibility of Banning Exemplary Damages from Contract
  • A.
  • Theory of Efficient Breach
  • B.
  • Objections to the Theory of Efficient Breach
  • C.
  • Relevance of the Theory of Efficient Breach
  • D.
  • Hadley v Baxendale
  • Inducement of Breach
  • E.
  • Cost of Contracting
  • F.
  • Crucial Differences between Contract and Tort
  • G.
  • Conclusion
  • II.
  • Defensibility of Banning Exemplary Damages from Equity
  • A.
  • II.
  • Is Punishment a Traditional Objective of Equity?
  • B.
  • Should Exemplary Damages be Available in Equity?
  • 17.
  • Abolition or Retention of Exemplary Damages
  • I.
  • Division between Civil Law and Criminal Law
  • A.
  • Attack on Exemplary Damages
  • B.
  • Victoria Laundry
  • Defence of Exemplary Damages
  • C.
  • Conclusion
  • II.
  • Policy Arguments against Exemplary Damages
  • A.
  • Uncertainty as to Availability and Amount
  • B.
  • Ineffectiveness of Predictable Awards
  • C.
  • III.
  • Incentive for Bogus Claims
  • III.
  • Policy Arguments in Favour of Exemplary Damages
  • A.
  • Appeasing the Victim
  • B.
  • Possibility of Vicarious Liability
  • IV.
  • Need for Exemplary Damages
  • A.
  • Heron II
  • Long-Standing Practice of Exemplary Awards
  • B.
  • Law Commission's Ten Examples
  • C.
  • Comparative View
  • V.
  • Conclusion
  • 18.
  • Conclusion
  • IV.
  • Introduction
  • Parsons
  • V.
  • SAAMCO
  • VI.
  • Brown v KMR Services Ltd
  • VII.
  • Jackson v Royal Bank of Scotland plc
  • VIII.
  • Achilleas
  • IX.
  • I.
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Uniform Remoteness Test throughout the Common Law
  • I.
  • Contract and Tort Compared
  • II.
  • Reforming both Contract and Tort
  • III.
  • Reforming Tort Only
  • IV.
  • Law of Obligations
  • Aligning Contract with Tort
  • A.
  • Fairness Argument
  • B.
  • Efficiency Argument
  • C.
  • Objections to the Efficiency Argument
  • i.
  • Prohibitive Costs
  • ii.
  • II.
  • Monopoly Situations
  • iii.
  • Strategic Dilemma for Reliable Carriers
  • iv.
  • Possibility of Menu
  • D.
  • Preventing Unreasonable Reliance upon Performance
  • E.
  • Contractual Liability is Generally Strict
  • F.
  • Law of Damages
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • Remoteness of Damage in Equity
  • I.
  • Misapplication of Trust Property
  • II.
  • Breach of an Equitable Duty of Care and Skill
  • III.
  • Breach of Fiduciary Duty
  • 6.
  • III.
  • Non-Pecuniary Loss in Tort
  • I.
  • Loss Resulting from Personal Injury
  • II.
  • Physical Inconvenience or Discomfort
  • III.
  • Loss of Reputation
  • IV.
  • Mental Distress
  • V.
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
viii, 181 p.
Isbn
9783110227741
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2010020073
Note
J.B. Rudnyckyj Research Fund 2011
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2191257-01umb_inst
  • 2338544
  • (Sirsi) i9783110227741
  • (OCoLC)614990456
Label
Complex emotions and grammatical mismatches : a contrastive corpus-based study, by Katarzyna Dziwirek, Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [167]-179) and index
Contents
  • Desirability of a Harmonised Measure of Damages
  • Bereavement
  • 7.
  • Non-Pecuniary Loss in Contract
  • I.
  • Overview of the Present Law
  • II.
  • General Bar to Compensation
  • III.
  • Exception for Personal Injury
  • IV.
  • IV.
  • Exception for Physical Inconvenience
  • V.
  • 'Object of the Contract' Exception
  • VI.
  • Loss of Reputation
  • VII.
  • Need for Reform
  • VIII.
  • Defensibility of the General Bar to Compensation
  • A.
  • Possibility of a Harmonised Measure of Damages
  • Avoiding Punishment
  • B.
  • Avoiding Excessive Awards
  • C.
  • General Remoteness of Non-Pecuniary Loss
  • D.
  • Assumption of Risk
  • E.
  • Difficult Assessment
  • F.
  • V.
  • Lower Cost of Contracting
  • G.
  • Avoiding a Flood of Claims
  • H.
  • Avoiding Bogus Claims
  • IX.
  • Way of Reform
  • 8.
  • Non-Pecuniary Loss in Equity
  • I.
  • Methodology Adopted in this Book
  • Breach of Confidence in Its Core Meaning
  • II.
  • Breach of Confidence in Its Extended Meaning ('Breach of Privacy')
  • III.
  • Other Equitable Wrongs
  • 9.
  • Contributory Negligence in Tort
  • I.
  • Position Apart From the1945 Act
  • II.
  • 2.
  • Ambit of the 1945 Act
  • III.
  • Causation
  • IV.
  • Claimant's Fault
  • V.
  • Damage
  • VI.
  • Apportionment
  • 10.
  • Present Remoteness Test in Tort
  • Contributory Negligence in Contract
  • I.
  • Position apart from the 1945 Act
  • II.
  • Impact of the 1945 Act[— ]Overview
  • III.
  • Breach of a Duty of Care Co-Extensive in Contract and Tort
  • IV.
  • Breach of a Purely Contractual Duty of Care
  • V.
  • I.
  • Strict Contractual Liability[— ]The Present Law
  • VI.
  • Need for Apportionment in Cases of Strict Liability
  • A.
  • Resorting to Causation Doctrine
  • B.
  • Resorting to Remoteness Doctrine
  • C.
  • Resorting to Mitigation Doctrine
  • VII.
  • Terminology
  • Defensibility of Denying Apportionment in Cases of Strict Liability
  • A.
  • No Duty to Supervise the Defendant
  • B.
  • Distribution of Blame is Difficult
  • C.
  • Uncertainty
  • D.
  • Inequalities of Bargaining Power
  • VIII.
  • II.
  • Way of Reform
  • 11.
  • Contributory Negligence in Equity
  • 12.
  • Present Law of 'Restitution for Wrongs'
  • I.
  • Terminology
  • II.
  • Inclusion of Hypothetical-Fee Awards
  • III.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Foreseeability Criterion in Negligence
  • Equity
  • A.
  • Breach of Fiduciary Duty
  • B.
  • Breach of Confidence Including Breach of Privacy
  • IV.
  • Tort
  • A.
  • Historical Development
  • B.
  • III.
  • Wrongful Interference with Goods
  • C.
  • Trespass to Land
  • D.
  • Intellectual Property Wrongs
  • E.
  • Nuisance
  • F.
  • Deceit and Fraud
  • V.
  • Damage Versus Risk
  • Contract
  • A.
  • Hypothetical-Fee Award ('Wrotham Park Damages')
  • B.
  • Account of Profits ('Blake Damages')
  • 13.
  • Proper Scope of 'Restitution for Wrongs'
  • I.
  • Existing Theories
  • A.
  • IV.
  • Birks
  • B.
  • Edelman
  • C.
  • Friedmann
  • D.
  • Jackman
  • E.
  • Jaffey
  • F.
  • Degree of Foresight Required
  • Tettenborn
  • G.
  • Weinrib
  • H.
  • Worthington
  • II.
  • Significance of Exclusive Entitlements
  • III.
  • Exclusive Entitlements Erga Omnes
  • A.
  • V.
  • Tangible and Intangible Property
  • B.
  • Bodily Integrity
  • C.
  • Reputation
  • D.
  • Informational Rights
  • IV.
  • Exclusive Entitlements Inter Partes
  • A.
  • 'Thin Skull' Rule
  • Contractual Right to Have Property Transferred
  • i.
  • Land and Intangible Property
  • ii.
  • Specific Chattel
  • iii.
  • Generic Goods
  • B.
  • Contractual Right to Be Treated As the Owner of Certain Property
  • C.
  • VI.
  • Contractual Right to Someone Else's 'Labour Power'?
  • D.
  • Right to the Loyalty of One's Fiduciary
  • V.
  • Situations in Which 'Restitution for Wrongs' is Inappropriate
  • A.
  • Deceit
  • B.
  • Skimped Contractual Performance
  • VI.
  • 'Scope of the Duty' Concept
  • Exclusive-Entitlement Theory and Present Law Compared
  • 14.
  • Present Law of Exemplary Damages
  • I.
  • Terminology
  • II.
  • Rookes v Barnard
  • III.
  • Abuse of Power by Civil Servants
  • A.
  • VII.
  • Conduct Required
  • B.
  • Status of the Defendant
  • C.
  • Criticism
  • IV.
  • Profit-Seeking Behaviour
  • A.
  • Fields of Application
  • B.
  • 1.
  • Torts other than Negligence
  • Criticism
  • V.
  • Statutory Authorisation
  • VI.
  • 'Cause of Action' Test
  • VII.
  • Exemplary Damages in Contract
  • VIII.
  • Exemplary Damages in Equity
  • IX.
  • 3.
  • Need for Reform
  • 15.
  • Objective of Exemplary Damages
  • I.
  • Penalising Reprehensible Behaviour
  • II.
  • Fostering Efficient Deterrence
  • A.
  • Correction for Undercompensation
  • B.
  • Present Remoteness Test in Contract
  • Correction for Underenforcement
  • C.
  • Correction for Court Errors
  • D.
  • Offsetting Illicit Benefits and Exceptional Costs
  • E.
  • Encouraging Negotiations about the Use of Rights
  • F.
  • Conclusion
  • 16.
  • I.
  • Defensibility of Confining Exemplary Damages to Tort
  • I.
  • Defensibility of Banning Exemplary Damages from Contract
  • A.
  • Theory of Efficient Breach
  • B.
  • Objections to the Theory of Efficient Breach
  • C.
  • Relevance of the Theory of Efficient Breach
  • D.
  • Hadley v Baxendale
  • Inducement of Breach
  • E.
  • Cost of Contracting
  • F.
  • Crucial Differences between Contract and Tort
  • G.
  • Conclusion
  • II.
  • Defensibility of Banning Exemplary Damages from Equity
  • A.
  • II.
  • Is Punishment a Traditional Objective of Equity?
  • B.
  • Should Exemplary Damages be Available in Equity?
  • 17.
  • Abolition or Retention of Exemplary Damages
  • I.
  • Division between Civil Law and Criminal Law
  • A.
  • Attack on Exemplary Damages
  • B.
  • Victoria Laundry
  • Defence of Exemplary Damages
  • C.
  • Conclusion
  • II.
  • Policy Arguments against Exemplary Damages
  • A.
  • Uncertainty as to Availability and Amount
  • B.
  • Ineffectiveness of Predictable Awards
  • C.
  • III.
  • Incentive for Bogus Claims
  • III.
  • Policy Arguments in Favour of Exemplary Damages
  • A.
  • Appeasing the Victim
  • B.
  • Possibility of Vicarious Liability
  • IV.
  • Need for Exemplary Damages
  • A.
  • Heron II
  • Long-Standing Practice of Exemplary Awards
  • B.
  • Law Commission's Ten Examples
  • C.
  • Comparative View
  • V.
  • Conclusion
  • 18.
  • Conclusion
  • IV.
  • Introduction
  • Parsons
  • V.
  • SAAMCO
  • VI.
  • Brown v KMR Services Ltd
  • VII.
  • Jackson v Royal Bank of Scotland plc
  • VIII.
  • Achilleas
  • IX.
  • I.
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Uniform Remoteness Test throughout the Common Law
  • I.
  • Contract and Tort Compared
  • II.
  • Reforming both Contract and Tort
  • III.
  • Reforming Tort Only
  • IV.
  • Law of Obligations
  • Aligning Contract with Tort
  • A.
  • Fairness Argument
  • B.
  • Efficiency Argument
  • C.
  • Objections to the Efficiency Argument
  • i.
  • Prohibitive Costs
  • ii.
  • II.
  • Monopoly Situations
  • iii.
  • Strategic Dilemma for Reliable Carriers
  • iv.
  • Possibility of Menu
  • D.
  • Preventing Unreasonable Reliance upon Performance
  • E.
  • Contractual Liability is Generally Strict
  • F.
  • Law of Damages
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • Remoteness of Damage in Equity
  • I.
  • Misapplication of Trust Property
  • II.
  • Breach of an Equitable Duty of Care and Skill
  • III.
  • Breach of Fiduciary Duty
  • 6.
  • III.
  • Non-Pecuniary Loss in Tort
  • I.
  • Loss Resulting from Personal Injury
  • II.
  • Physical Inconvenience or Discomfort
  • III.
  • Loss of Reputation
  • IV.
  • Mental Distress
  • V.
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
viii, 181 p.
Isbn
9783110227741
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2010020073
Note
J.B. Rudnyckyj Research Fund 2011
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2191257-01umb_inst
  • 2338544
  • (Sirsi) i9783110227741
  • (OCoLC)614990456

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  • Sister St. Odilon Library (Misericordia Health Centre)Borrow it
    99 Cornish Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3C 1A2, CA
    49.879592 -97.160425
  • St. John's College LibraryBorrow it
    92 Dysart Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2M5, CA
    49.811242 -97.137156
  • Victoria General Hospital LibraryBorrow it
    2340 Pembina Highway, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2E8, CA
    49.806755 -97.152739
  • William R Newman Library (Agriculture)Borrow it
    66 Dafoe Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2R3, CA
    49.806936 -97.135525
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