The Resource Family law, gender and the state, Alison Diduck and Felicity Kaganas

Family law, gender and the state, Alison Diduck and Felicity Kaganas

Label
Family law, gender and the state
Title
Family law, gender and the state
Statement of responsibility
Alison Diduck and Felicity Kaganas
Title variation
Family law, gender and the state
Title variation remainder
text, cases and materials
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
UKMGB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Diduck, Alison
Dewey number
346.42015
Index
index present
LC call number
KD750
LC item number
.D53 2012
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Kaganas, Felicity
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Domestic relations
  • Family policy
Label
Family law, gender and the state, Alison Diduck and Felicity Kaganas
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 745-792) and index
Contents
  • Families and the Law: Questioning Some Assumptions
  • Education
  • Housing and Healthcare
  • VIII.
  • Being a Mother, Being a Father and Being a Child
  • Mothers and Fathers
  • Children
  • IX.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 5.
  • Family Ideology
  • Family-State Relationship: Social Policy
  • I.
  • Family Living and Social Policy
  • II.
  • Child Poverty, Work and Benefit: Serving Two Masters?
  • Current Law: Tax and Social Benefits
  • Social Security Law and Gender
  • III.
  • Support and Compulsion for Parents
  • Criminal Responsibility
  • III.
  • IV.
  • Work-Life Balance
  • Employment Law and Policy
  • Employment and Reproduction
  • Maternity Rights
  • Paternity Rights
  • Parental Leave and Flexible Working
  • Childcare
  • Work and Family and the State: Some Observations
  • V.
  • What is Family Law?
  • Housing
  • VI.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • pt. II
  • Principles And The Law
  • Section 1
  • Equality
  • Introduction
  • 6.
  • IV.
  • Household Economics
  • I.
  • Family Income
  • Waged Income
  • Historical View
  • Women and Work
  • Contextual Perspective
  • Children and Work
  • Other Income
  • II.
  • Legal Family
  • Sharing Income and Property in Families
  • Maintenance During the Relationship
  • III.
  • Acquiring Property
  • Separate Property
  • Beneficial Ownership: Express Trust
  • Implied Trusts
  • Resulting Trust
  • Common Intention Constructive Trust
  • Constructive Trust or Proprietary Estoppel?
  • V.
  • Summary
  • Alternatives 1
  • Unjust Enrichment and the Remedial Constructive Trust
  • Alternatives 2
  • Community of Property
  • IV.
  • Statutory Reform
  • V.
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • `Choice' and our Freedom to Choose How to Order Our Familial Lives
  • Further Reading
  • 7.
  • Dividing the Family Assets
  • I.
  • Historical Overview
  • II.
  • Move to Equality
  • III.
  • Fairness: Rethinking Equality
  • IV.
  • VI.
  • Making the Orders
  • Special Case of Pensions
  • Prenuptial and Postnuptial Agreements
  • V.
  • Child Support
  • VI.
  • Reform?
  • Ancillary Relief and Child Support
  • Separating Cohabitants
  • Marital Agreements: Marriage as Contract?
  • Conclusions
  • VII.
  • Conclusion: Is There any Role for Equality in Family Economies?
  • Further Reading
  • 8.
  • Equal Status under the Children Act 1989: Parental Responsibility
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • From Paternal Rights to Shared Parental Responsibility
  • III.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Further Reading
  • Explanations for the Change to Shared and Enduring Parental Responsibility
  • IV.
  • Parental Responsibility, Welfare and Equality
  • V.
  • Having and Acquiring Parental Responsibility
  • VI.
  • Parental Responsibility, Joint Parenting and the Duty to Consult
  • VII.
  • Unmarried Fathers and Parental Responsibility
  • VIII.
  • 2.
  • Unmarried Father and Human Rights
  • IX.
  • Parental Responsibility Orders
  • Responsible Father
  • X.
  • Welfare of the Child
  • XI.
  • Effect of Having Parental Responsibility
  • Parental Responsibility and the Non-resident Parent
  • Parental Responsibility and the Resident Parent
  • Personal Relationships and Legal Status
  • Parental Responsibility: A Matter of Words?
  • XII.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • Section 2
  • Welfare
  • Introduction
  • 9.
  • Welfare Principle
  • I.
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • Legislation and the Welfare Principle
  • III.
  • From Status to Welfare
  • IV.
  • Paramountcy of Welfare
  • V.
  • Human Rights Act and Welfare
  • VI.
  • Marriage as a Social Institution
  • Scope of the Welfare Principle
  • VII.
  • Deciding What is Good for Children---The Problem of Indeterminacy
  • VIII.
  • Welfare Principle and the `Good' Post-separation Family
  • IX.
  • Child Welfare Knowledge
  • X.
  • Alternatives to the Welfare Principle
  • Welfare and Shared Parenting
  • II.
  • XI.
  • Policies and Research
  • Promoting `Responsible' Parenting: Making Contact Work
  • XII.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 10.
  • Disputes about Children and the Application of the Welfare Principle
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • Marriage as a Legal Institution
  • II.
  • Power of the Court to Make Section 8 Orders
  • Settlement Culture
  • Safety
  • Restricting Access to the Court
  • III.
  • Welfare Principle
  • IV.
  • No Order Principle
  • V.
  • III.
  • Residence
  • VI.
  • Applying the Welfare Principle
  • Checklist---Section 1(3) Children Act 1989
  • VII.
  • Shared Residence
  • VIII.
  • Contact
  • Child Welfare Knowledge
  • Courts and Contact
  • Getting Married
  • Approach of the Courts---A Research Study
  • Checklist
  • Making Contact Happen and Enforcement of Contact Orders
  • Therapeutic Intervention
  • IX.
  • Relocation
  • Relocation and Shared Care
  • X.
  • Violence and Child Abuse
  • Harm to the Child
  • IV.
  • Effects of Re L and of the Safeguards
  • XI.
  • Contact Centres
  • XII.
  • Specific Issue Orders
  • XIII.
  • Prohibited Steps Order
  • XIV.
  • Section 8 Orders and Education: Who Decides?
  • XV.
  • pt. I
  • Language of Consent
  • Family Justice Review
  • XVI.
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • Further Reading
  • 11.
  • Decisions about Children's Upbringing
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • V.
  • Parental Responsibility and Decision-making
  • III.
  • Competent Minor and Medical Treatment
  • Gillick/Fraser Competence
  • `Retreat' from Gillick
  • IV.
  • Medical Treatment of Neonates and Babies
  • Introduction
  • Infants and `Personhood'
  • Best Interests Test
  • Permanent Heterosexual Union
  • Parents, the Doctors and the Courts
  • V.
  • Children In Court
  • Listening to Children
  • Party Status and Separate Representation
  • Powers and Duties of Children's Guardian and Litigation Friend
  • Separate Representation and the `Mature' Minor
  • Children's Evidence
  • VI.
  • Conclusion
  • VI.
  • Further Reading
  • Section 3
  • Public/Private Divide
  • Introduction
  • 12.
  • Public or Private Matter? Domestic Violence
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • What is Domestic Violence?
  • One Man and One Woman
  • Definition
  • Perpetrators and Victims
  • III.
  • Historical Background
  • Legal Position of Husbands and Wives
  • IV.
  • Explanations for the Husband's Rights
  • V.
  • Emergence of Wife-beating as a Social Problem
  • VI.
  • VII.
  • Modern Emergence of Domestic Violence as a Social Problem
  • VII.
  • `Causes' of Domestic Violence
  • VIII.
  • Equality within Marriage---The Abolition of the Marital Rape Exemption
  • IX.
  • Criminal Justice System
  • Police
  • Crown Prosecution Service
  • Courts
  • Civil Partnership Act 2004
  • Perpetrator Programmes
  • X.
  • Protection from Harassment Act 1997
  • XI.
  • Criminal or Civil Proceedings?
  • XII.
  • Civil Law
  • XIII.
  • Family Law Act 1996
  • Non-Molestation Order
  • VIII.
  • `Associated Persons'
  • Occupation Order
  • `Person Entitled'
  • Applying the `Balance of Harm Test'
  • `Draconian' Order
  • Non-entitled Former Spouse or Former Civil Partner
  • Non-entitled Cohabitant or Former Cohabitant
  • Neither Party Entitled to Occupy
  • Children
  • Applications by Third Parties
  • History of Marriage
  • Ancillary Provisions
  • Orders Without Notice
  • Enforcement
  • Power of Arrest
  • Warrant for Arrest
  • Offence of Breaching a Non-molestation Order
  • Evaluating the Law
  • XIV.
  • Co-ordinated Response---Further Reform
  • Domestic Violence Protection Notices and Orders
  • IX.
  • XV.
  • Forced Marriage
  • XVI.
  • Family Privacy Revisited
  • XVII.
  • Housing
  • XVIII.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 13.
  • Families and Relationships
  • Formal and Informal Relationships
  • Public or Private Matter? Child Abuse
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • Construction of Social Problems
  • III.
  • Constructions of Childhood
  • IV.
  • Child Concern and the Role of the State
  • Protection through `Tutelage'
  • X.
  • `Cruelty Act': Protecting Children or Protecting Society?
  • Shifting Patterns of Concern
  • V.
  • Child Abuse---The Beginnings of Contemporary Concern
  • Sexual Abuse
  • VI.
  • Defining Abuse
  • `Significant Harm'
  • VII.
  • `Causes' of Child Abuse
  • Summary and Conclusion
  • Neglect, Physical and Emotional Abuse
  • Sexual Abuse
  • VIII.
  • `High-Risk' Family
  • Identifying and Predicting Child Abuse --
  • Further Reading
  • 3.
  • Dissolution of Legal Relationships: The Process and its Consequences
  • I.
  • Divorce---Introduction
  • II.
  • History of Divorce
  • 1.
  • III.
  • Matrimonial Causes Act 1973
  • Ground for Divorce
  • IV.
  • Divorce Reform 1969-2010
  • V.
  • Legacy of the Family Law Act 1996
  • VI.
  • Civil Partnership Act 2004
  • VII.
  • Law and `The Family'
  • Nullity and Judicial Separation
  • VIII.
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Parent-Child Relationships
  • I.
  • Becoming a Parent: Rights and the Regulation of Reproduction
  • II.
  • Diluting the Right to Reproduce: Welfare and the `Sexual Family'
  • III.
  • I.
  • Regulation of Reproduction: The Right Not to Reproduce
  • Contraception
  • Abortion
  • Conclusion
  • IV.
  • Mothers and Fathers: The `Fragmentation' of Parenthood?
  • V.
  • Who is a Parent? Becoming a Mother
  • Biological Mothers
  • Surrogacy
  • Families and Societies
  • Non-biological Mothers
  • Adoption
  • Increasing the Range of Permanency Options---Special Guardians
  • Other Ways to Become a Parent---Guardianship
  • Parental Responsibility: Residence Orders
  • Social Motherhood---No Legal Status
  • Foster Parents
  • VI.
  • Who is a Parent? Becoming a Father
  • Fatherhood---The Significance of Biology
  • II.
  • Fatherhood-The Significance of Intention
  • Adoption
  • Social Fatherhood---No Legal Status
  • Step-parents
  • Conclusion
  • VII.
  • What Does it Mean to be a Parent? Day-to-Day Responsibilities
  • Parental Responsibility
  • Parental Responsibility under the Children Act
  • Criminal Responsibility
  • X.
  • Outcomes and the Client's View
  • VI.
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution: The Other Alternatives Available
  • Collaborative Law
  • Financial Dispute Resolution
  • Parenting Agreements
  • VII.
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • Further Reading
  • Family Support and the Children Act 2004
  • XI.
  • Early Intervention
  • XII.
  • Family Group Conferences
  • XIII.
  • Local Authority Accountability
  • Negligence
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • Contents note continued:
  • XIV.
  • Reforming The System
  • XV.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 14.
  • Child Protection
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • IX.
  • From `Risk' to `Need'?
  • Children in Need or at Risk---Assessment
  • III.
  • Legal Criteria for the Granting of Court Orders
  • IV.
  • Immediate Protection and Investigation
  • Impeding Access to the Child
  • Outcome of the Investigation
  • Child Protection Conference
  • V.
  • Role of Professionals and the Law: The Children Act 1989
  • Accommodating Children
  • VI.
  • Court Orders: Emergency Proceeedings
  • Child Assessment Order
  • Emergency Protection Order
  • VII.
  • Care Plans
  • VIII.
  • Children's Guardian
  • IX.
  • Children Act 1989---The Background
  • Interim Orders
  • X.
  • Care and Supervision Orders---Threshold Criteria
  • `Is Suffering'
  • `Is Likely to Suffer'
  • Standard of Parental Care
  • XI.
  • Effects of a Care Order
  • XII.
  • Challenging Local Authority Decisions in Court
  • Children Act 1989
  • XIII.
  • Supervision Orders
  • XIV.
  • Care Order or Supervision Order?
  • XV.
  • Excluding the Abuser---The Family Law Act 1996, Section 8 Orders under the Children Act 1989 and Inherent Jurisdiction
  • Wardship and the Court's Inherent Jurisdiction
  • XVI.
  • Reforming the System
  • XVII.
  • Partnership
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • Further Reading
  • 15.
  • Public or Private Matter---Alternative Dispute Resolution and Negotiation
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Background to the Rise of Mediation and ADR
  • Partnership---The Emphasis on Parental Responsibility
  • Forms of ADR
  • Mediation
  • Financial Dispute Resolution
  • Lawyer Negotiation
  • Collaborative Law
  • Therapy and Counselling
  • In-court Conciliation
  • III.
  • Mediation
  • Mediation---A Voluntary Process?
  • Partnership---Regulating the Family
  • Why Mediation?
  • Autonomy and Control
  • Dominant Norms
  • Power and Mediation
  • Domestic Violence and Mediation
  • Mediation and Children's Welfare
  • Harmonious Divorce/Separation?
  • IV.
  • Negotiating Through Lawyers
  • V.
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
lv, 814 p.
Isbn
9781849461498
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Note
Manitoba Law Foundation Fund Collection 2011/12
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2528205-01umb_inst
  • 2555196
  • (Sirsi) i9781849461498
  • (OCoLC)754168805
Label
Family law, gender and the state, Alison Diduck and Felicity Kaganas
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 745-792) and index
Contents
  • Families and the Law: Questioning Some Assumptions
  • Education
  • Housing and Healthcare
  • VIII.
  • Being a Mother, Being a Father and Being a Child
  • Mothers and Fathers
  • Children
  • IX.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 5.
  • Family Ideology
  • Family-State Relationship: Social Policy
  • I.
  • Family Living and Social Policy
  • II.
  • Child Poverty, Work and Benefit: Serving Two Masters?
  • Current Law: Tax and Social Benefits
  • Social Security Law and Gender
  • III.
  • Support and Compulsion for Parents
  • Criminal Responsibility
  • III.
  • IV.
  • Work-Life Balance
  • Employment Law and Policy
  • Employment and Reproduction
  • Maternity Rights
  • Paternity Rights
  • Parental Leave and Flexible Working
  • Childcare
  • Work and Family and the State: Some Observations
  • V.
  • What is Family Law?
  • Housing
  • VI.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • pt. II
  • Principles And The Law
  • Section 1
  • Equality
  • Introduction
  • 6.
  • IV.
  • Household Economics
  • I.
  • Family Income
  • Waged Income
  • Historical View
  • Women and Work
  • Contextual Perspective
  • Children and Work
  • Other Income
  • II.
  • Legal Family
  • Sharing Income and Property in Families
  • Maintenance During the Relationship
  • III.
  • Acquiring Property
  • Separate Property
  • Beneficial Ownership: Express Trust
  • Implied Trusts
  • Resulting Trust
  • Common Intention Constructive Trust
  • Constructive Trust or Proprietary Estoppel?
  • V.
  • Summary
  • Alternatives 1
  • Unjust Enrichment and the Remedial Constructive Trust
  • Alternatives 2
  • Community of Property
  • IV.
  • Statutory Reform
  • V.
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • `Choice' and our Freedom to Choose How to Order Our Familial Lives
  • Further Reading
  • 7.
  • Dividing the Family Assets
  • I.
  • Historical Overview
  • II.
  • Move to Equality
  • III.
  • Fairness: Rethinking Equality
  • IV.
  • VI.
  • Making the Orders
  • Special Case of Pensions
  • Prenuptial and Postnuptial Agreements
  • V.
  • Child Support
  • VI.
  • Reform?
  • Ancillary Relief and Child Support
  • Separating Cohabitants
  • Marital Agreements: Marriage as Contract?
  • Conclusions
  • VII.
  • Conclusion: Is There any Role for Equality in Family Economies?
  • Further Reading
  • 8.
  • Equal Status under the Children Act 1989: Parental Responsibility
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • From Paternal Rights to Shared Parental Responsibility
  • III.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Further Reading
  • Explanations for the Change to Shared and Enduring Parental Responsibility
  • IV.
  • Parental Responsibility, Welfare and Equality
  • V.
  • Having and Acquiring Parental Responsibility
  • VI.
  • Parental Responsibility, Joint Parenting and the Duty to Consult
  • VII.
  • Unmarried Fathers and Parental Responsibility
  • VIII.
  • 2.
  • Unmarried Father and Human Rights
  • IX.
  • Parental Responsibility Orders
  • Responsible Father
  • X.
  • Welfare of the Child
  • XI.
  • Effect of Having Parental Responsibility
  • Parental Responsibility and the Non-resident Parent
  • Parental Responsibility and the Resident Parent
  • Personal Relationships and Legal Status
  • Parental Responsibility: A Matter of Words?
  • XII.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • Section 2
  • Welfare
  • Introduction
  • 9.
  • Welfare Principle
  • I.
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • Legislation and the Welfare Principle
  • III.
  • From Status to Welfare
  • IV.
  • Paramountcy of Welfare
  • V.
  • Human Rights Act and Welfare
  • VI.
  • Marriage as a Social Institution
  • Scope of the Welfare Principle
  • VII.
  • Deciding What is Good for Children---The Problem of Indeterminacy
  • VIII.
  • Welfare Principle and the `Good' Post-separation Family
  • IX.
  • Child Welfare Knowledge
  • X.
  • Alternatives to the Welfare Principle
  • Welfare and Shared Parenting
  • II.
  • XI.
  • Policies and Research
  • Promoting `Responsible' Parenting: Making Contact Work
  • XII.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 10.
  • Disputes about Children and the Application of the Welfare Principle
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • Marriage as a Legal Institution
  • II.
  • Power of the Court to Make Section 8 Orders
  • Settlement Culture
  • Safety
  • Restricting Access to the Court
  • III.
  • Welfare Principle
  • IV.
  • No Order Principle
  • V.
  • III.
  • Residence
  • VI.
  • Applying the Welfare Principle
  • Checklist---Section 1(3) Children Act 1989
  • VII.
  • Shared Residence
  • VIII.
  • Contact
  • Child Welfare Knowledge
  • Courts and Contact
  • Getting Married
  • Approach of the Courts---A Research Study
  • Checklist
  • Making Contact Happen and Enforcement of Contact Orders
  • Therapeutic Intervention
  • IX.
  • Relocation
  • Relocation and Shared Care
  • X.
  • Violence and Child Abuse
  • Harm to the Child
  • IV.
  • Effects of Re L and of the Safeguards
  • XI.
  • Contact Centres
  • XII.
  • Specific Issue Orders
  • XIII.
  • Prohibited Steps Order
  • XIV.
  • Section 8 Orders and Education: Who Decides?
  • XV.
  • pt. I
  • Language of Consent
  • Family Justice Review
  • XVI.
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • Further Reading
  • 11.
  • Decisions about Children's Upbringing
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • V.
  • Parental Responsibility and Decision-making
  • III.
  • Competent Minor and Medical Treatment
  • Gillick/Fraser Competence
  • `Retreat' from Gillick
  • IV.
  • Medical Treatment of Neonates and Babies
  • Introduction
  • Infants and `Personhood'
  • Best Interests Test
  • Permanent Heterosexual Union
  • Parents, the Doctors and the Courts
  • V.
  • Children In Court
  • Listening to Children
  • Party Status and Separate Representation
  • Powers and Duties of Children's Guardian and Litigation Friend
  • Separate Representation and the `Mature' Minor
  • Children's Evidence
  • VI.
  • Conclusion
  • VI.
  • Further Reading
  • Section 3
  • Public/Private Divide
  • Introduction
  • 12.
  • Public or Private Matter? Domestic Violence
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • What is Domestic Violence?
  • One Man and One Woman
  • Definition
  • Perpetrators and Victims
  • III.
  • Historical Background
  • Legal Position of Husbands and Wives
  • IV.
  • Explanations for the Husband's Rights
  • V.
  • Emergence of Wife-beating as a Social Problem
  • VI.
  • VII.
  • Modern Emergence of Domestic Violence as a Social Problem
  • VII.
  • `Causes' of Domestic Violence
  • VIII.
  • Equality within Marriage---The Abolition of the Marital Rape Exemption
  • IX.
  • Criminal Justice System
  • Police
  • Crown Prosecution Service
  • Courts
  • Civil Partnership Act 2004
  • Perpetrator Programmes
  • X.
  • Protection from Harassment Act 1997
  • XI.
  • Criminal or Civil Proceedings?
  • XII.
  • Civil Law
  • XIII.
  • Family Law Act 1996
  • Non-Molestation Order
  • VIII.
  • `Associated Persons'
  • Occupation Order
  • `Person Entitled'
  • Applying the `Balance of Harm Test'
  • `Draconian' Order
  • Non-entitled Former Spouse or Former Civil Partner
  • Non-entitled Cohabitant or Former Cohabitant
  • Neither Party Entitled to Occupy
  • Children
  • Applications by Third Parties
  • History of Marriage
  • Ancillary Provisions
  • Orders Without Notice
  • Enforcement
  • Power of Arrest
  • Warrant for Arrest
  • Offence of Breaching a Non-molestation Order
  • Evaluating the Law
  • XIV.
  • Co-ordinated Response---Further Reform
  • Domestic Violence Protection Notices and Orders
  • IX.
  • XV.
  • Forced Marriage
  • XVI.
  • Family Privacy Revisited
  • XVII.
  • Housing
  • XVIII.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 13.
  • Families and Relationships
  • Formal and Informal Relationships
  • Public or Private Matter? Child Abuse
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • Construction of Social Problems
  • III.
  • Constructions of Childhood
  • IV.
  • Child Concern and the Role of the State
  • Protection through `Tutelage'
  • X.
  • `Cruelty Act': Protecting Children or Protecting Society?
  • Shifting Patterns of Concern
  • V.
  • Child Abuse---The Beginnings of Contemporary Concern
  • Sexual Abuse
  • VI.
  • Defining Abuse
  • `Significant Harm'
  • VII.
  • `Causes' of Child Abuse
  • Summary and Conclusion
  • Neglect, Physical and Emotional Abuse
  • Sexual Abuse
  • VIII.
  • `High-Risk' Family
  • Identifying and Predicting Child Abuse --
  • Further Reading
  • 3.
  • Dissolution of Legal Relationships: The Process and its Consequences
  • I.
  • Divorce---Introduction
  • II.
  • History of Divorce
  • 1.
  • III.
  • Matrimonial Causes Act 1973
  • Ground for Divorce
  • IV.
  • Divorce Reform 1969-2010
  • V.
  • Legacy of the Family Law Act 1996
  • VI.
  • Civil Partnership Act 2004
  • VII.
  • Law and `The Family'
  • Nullity and Judicial Separation
  • VIII.
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Parent-Child Relationships
  • I.
  • Becoming a Parent: Rights and the Regulation of Reproduction
  • II.
  • Diluting the Right to Reproduce: Welfare and the `Sexual Family'
  • III.
  • I.
  • Regulation of Reproduction: The Right Not to Reproduce
  • Contraception
  • Abortion
  • Conclusion
  • IV.
  • Mothers and Fathers: The `Fragmentation' of Parenthood?
  • V.
  • Who is a Parent? Becoming a Mother
  • Biological Mothers
  • Surrogacy
  • Families and Societies
  • Non-biological Mothers
  • Adoption
  • Increasing the Range of Permanency Options---Special Guardians
  • Other Ways to Become a Parent---Guardianship
  • Parental Responsibility: Residence Orders
  • Social Motherhood---No Legal Status
  • Foster Parents
  • VI.
  • Who is a Parent? Becoming a Father
  • Fatherhood---The Significance of Biology
  • II.
  • Fatherhood-The Significance of Intention
  • Adoption
  • Social Fatherhood---No Legal Status
  • Step-parents
  • Conclusion
  • VII.
  • What Does it Mean to be a Parent? Day-to-Day Responsibilities
  • Parental Responsibility
  • Parental Responsibility under the Children Act
  • Criminal Responsibility
  • X.
  • Outcomes and the Client's View
  • VI.
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution: The Other Alternatives Available
  • Collaborative Law
  • Financial Dispute Resolution
  • Parenting Agreements
  • VII.
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • Further Reading
  • Family Support and the Children Act 2004
  • XI.
  • Early Intervention
  • XII.
  • Family Group Conferences
  • XIII.
  • Local Authority Accountability
  • Negligence
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • Contents note continued:
  • XIV.
  • Reforming The System
  • XV.
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 14.
  • Child Protection
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • IX.
  • From `Risk' to `Need'?
  • Children in Need or at Risk---Assessment
  • III.
  • Legal Criteria for the Granting of Court Orders
  • IV.
  • Immediate Protection and Investigation
  • Impeding Access to the Child
  • Outcome of the Investigation
  • Child Protection Conference
  • V.
  • Role of Professionals and the Law: The Children Act 1989
  • Accommodating Children
  • VI.
  • Court Orders: Emergency Proceeedings
  • Child Assessment Order
  • Emergency Protection Order
  • VII.
  • Care Plans
  • VIII.
  • Children's Guardian
  • IX.
  • Children Act 1989---The Background
  • Interim Orders
  • X.
  • Care and Supervision Orders---Threshold Criteria
  • `Is Suffering'
  • `Is Likely to Suffer'
  • Standard of Parental Care
  • XI.
  • Effects of a Care Order
  • XII.
  • Challenging Local Authority Decisions in Court
  • Children Act 1989
  • XIII.
  • Supervision Orders
  • XIV.
  • Care Order or Supervision Order?
  • XV.
  • Excluding the Abuser---The Family Law Act 1996, Section 8 Orders under the Children Act 1989 and Inherent Jurisdiction
  • Wardship and the Court's Inherent Jurisdiction
  • XVI.
  • Reforming the System
  • XVII.
  • Partnership
  • Conclusion
  • Postscript
  • Further Reading
  • 15.
  • Public or Private Matter---Alternative Dispute Resolution and Negotiation
  • I.
  • Introduction
  • II.
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Background to the Rise of Mediation and ADR
  • Partnership---The Emphasis on Parental Responsibility
  • Forms of ADR
  • Mediation
  • Financial Dispute Resolution
  • Lawyer Negotiation
  • Collaborative Law
  • Therapy and Counselling
  • In-court Conciliation
  • III.
  • Mediation
  • Mediation---A Voluntary Process?
  • Partnership---Regulating the Family
  • Why Mediation?
  • Autonomy and Control
  • Dominant Norms
  • Power and Mediation
  • Domestic Violence and Mediation
  • Mediation and Children's Welfare
  • Harmonious Divorce/Separation?
  • IV.
  • Negotiating Through Lawyers
  • V.
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
lv, 814 p.
Isbn
9781849461498
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Note
Manitoba Law Foundation Fund Collection 2011/12
System control number
  • (CaMWU)u2528205-01umb_inst
  • 2555196
  • (Sirsi) i9781849461498
  • (OCoLC)754168805

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