Context

Context of The man of manners: or, Plebeian polish'd. : Being plain and familiar rules for a modest and genteel bahaviour, on most of the ordinary occasions of life. Whereby the many vanities, weakness and impertinences incident to human nature, (which expose persons to contempt and ridicule) may be easily avoided. Written chiefly for the use and benefit of persons of mean births and education, who have unaccountably plung'd themselves into wealth and power. The manner of walking the streets and other publick places. The usual salutations and greetings, down from the complaisant grin and sneer of quality, to the honest porterly how-d'ye, or the more homely, civility, how fares your best body? the manner of a city family's sitting at dinner. wholesale traders, great money-jochers and other rich plodders, their sentiments of breeding and good manners. Common conversation a meer comedy. Rules recommended to preachers for a modest and courtly behaviour towards the Beau Monde. Scandalous indecenceis at churches in time of divine service; a misfortune to the Church of England, that Farinelli and Senesino were not bred Protestants. Rudeness of the cockaded gentry to modest tradesmen. Blazing beaus of the towns, in debted for every article of their wearing apparel, from the crowns of their head, to the soles of their feet, except the Bath metal buttons at their shirt-sleeves. The Irishman's caution and modesty, in refusing to look at the corpse of his dead contryman, on account of his having a stinking breath when living. Street hunchers, jostlers, and coach-splashers, taken notice of. A notable verbal encounter between two ladies, that deal in fersh cod and live lobsters. With variety of other matters, moral, serious an comical, (electronic resource)

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